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Behav Res Ther. 2007 Mar;45(3):577-89. Epub 2006 Jul 11.

An open clinical trial of cognitive-behaviour therapy in children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder administered in regular outpatient clinics.

Author information

  • 1Department of Neuroscience, Center for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, MTFS, 7489 Trondheim, Norway. robert.valderhaug@ntnu.no

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to examine the effectiveness of manual-guided cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) for childhood obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) administered within three regular, i.e., non-academic, Norwegian outpatient child psychiatric clinics.

METHODS:

A total of 28 youngsters, aged 8-17 with primary OCD entered the study. Assessment at intake included Norwegian versions of the K-SADS-PL, Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (CY-BOCS), and a measure of OCD-specific functional impairment (Child OCD Impact Scale (COIS)). Therapy consisted of 12 manual-guided sessions with combined individual and family CBT-based interventions and was conducted by psychologists and physicians under training and supervision. Outcome was assessed after treatment and at 3- and 6-month follow-ups by means of the CY-BOCS, the Clinical Global Impression (CGI) and the CGI-Improvement scales, and the COIS.

RESULTS:

Twenty-four youngsters (86%) completed treatment and were available for the follow-up assessments. Significant improvements were found on all outcome measures after treatment, including a mean symptom reduction on the CY-BOCS of 60.6%, increasing to 68.8% at the 6-month follow-up. Estimates of within-group effect sizes showed strong effects of treatment.

CONCLUSION:

The results of the present study suggest that manual-guided CBT for childhood OCD can be successfully implemented in non-academic community child psychiatric settings with outcomes in accordance with previous findings from highly specialised university clinics.

PMID:
16836977
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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