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Circulation. 2006 Jul 4;114(1 Suppl):I344-9.

High-dose beta-blockers and tight heart rate control reduce myocardial ischemia and troponin T release in vascular surgery patients.

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  • 1Department of Anesthesiology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Adverse perioperative cardiac events occur frequently despite the use of beta (beta)-blockers. We examined whether higher doses of beta-blockers and tight heart rate control were associated with reduced perioperative myocardial ischemia and troponin T release and improved long-term outcome.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

In an observational cohort study, 272 vascular surgery patients were preoperatively screened for cardiac risk factors and beta-blocker dose. Beta-blocker dose was converted to a percentage of maximum recommended therapeutic dose. Heart rate and ischemic episodes were recorded by continuous 12-lead electrocardiography, starting 1 day before to 2 days after surgery. Serial troponin T levels were measured after surgery. All-cause mortality was noted during follow-up. Myocardial ischemia was detected in 85 of 272 (31%) patients and troponin T release in 44 of 272 (16.2%). Long-term mortality occurred in 66 of 272 (24.2%) patients. In multivariate analysis, higher beta-blocker doses (per 10% increase) were significantly associated with a lower incidence of myocardial ischemia (hazard ratio [HR], 0.62; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.51 to 0.75), troponin T release (HR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.49 to 0.80), and long-term mortality (HR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.76 to 0.97). Higher heart rates during electrocardiographic monitoring (per 10-bpm increase) were significantly associated with an increased incidence of myocardial ischemia (HR, 2.49; 95% CI, 1.79 to 3.48), troponin T release (HR, 1.53; 95% CI, 1.16 to 2.03), and long-term mortality (HR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.14 to 1.76).

CONCLUSIONS:

This study showed that higher doses of beta-blockers and tight heart rate control are associated with reduced perioperative myocardial ischemia and troponin T release and improved long-term outcome in vascular surgery patients.

PMID:
16820598
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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