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Biol Psychiatry. 2007 Feb 1;61(3):348-58. Epub 2006 Jul 3.

The prevalence and correlates of eating disorders in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School and Biological Psychiatry Laboratory, McLean Hospital, Belmont, Massachusetts 02478, USA. jhudson@mclean.harvard.edu

Erratum in

  • Biol Psychiatry. 2012 Jul 15;72(2):164.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Little population-based data exist on the prevalence or correlates of eating disorders.

METHODS:

Prevalence and correlates of eating disorders from the National Comorbidity Replication, a nationally representative face-to-face household survey (n = 9282), conducted in 2001-2003, were assessed using the WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview.

RESULTS:

Lifetime prevalence estimates of DSM-IV anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder are .9%, 1.5%, and 3.5% among women, and .3% .5%, and 2.0% among men. Survival analysis based on retrospective age-of-onset reports suggests that risk of bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder increased with successive birth cohorts. All 3 disorders are significantly comorbid with many other DSM-IV disorders. Lifetime anorexia nervosa is significantly associated with low current weight (body-mass index <18.5), whereas lifetime binge eating disorder is associated with current severe obesity (body-mass index > or =40). Although most respondents with 12-month bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder report some role impairment (data unavailable for anorexia nervosa since no respondents met criteria for 12-month prevalence), only a minority of cases ever sought treatment.

CONCLUSIONS:

Eating disorders, although relatively uncommon, represent a public health concern because they are frequently associated with other psychopathology and role impairment, and are frequently under-treated.

PMID:
16815322
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1892232
Free PMC Article

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