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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2006 Jul 11;103(28):10771-4. Epub 2006 Jun 28.

Biological versus nonbiological older brothers and men's sexual orientation.

Author information

  • Department of Community Health Sciences, Brock University, St. Catharines, ON, Canada. tbogaert@brocku.ca

Abstract

The most consistent biodemographic correlate of sexual orientation in men is the number of older brothers (fraternal birth order). The mechanism underlying this effect remains unknown. In this article, I provide a direct test pitting prenatal against postnatal (e.g., social/rearing) mechanisms. Four samples of homosexual and heterosexual men (total n = 944), including one sample of men raised in nonbiological and blended families (e.g., raised with half- or step-siblings or as adoptees) were studied. Only biological older brothers, and not any other sibling characteristic, including nonbiological older brothers, predicted men's sexual orientation, regardless of the amount of time reared with these siblings. These results strongly suggest a prenatal origin to the fraternal birth-order effect.

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PMID:
16807297
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1502306
Free PMC Article

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