Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Pancreas. 2006 Jul;33(1):38-44.

Aberrant expression of PTCH (patched gene) and Smo (smoothened gene) in human pancreatic cancerous tissues and its association with hyperglycemia.

Author information

  • 1Department of Gastroenterology, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To investigate the prevalence of PTCH (patched gene) and Smo (smoothened gene) expression in human pancreatic cancerous tissues and its association with clinical characteristics.

METHODS:

A rabbit polyclonal antibody against PTCH was prepared through the immunization of prokaryotic recombinant PTCH1170-1433 protein. The PTCH and Smo expression in 39 resected pancreas specimens from 28 patients with pancreatic cancer, 6 with chronic pancreatitis (as control), and 5 with pancreatic pseudocyst (as control) were detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. The relationships between their expressions and pathological characteristics such as tumor sizes, degree of differentiation, nodal status, distant metastasis, and the blood sugar level were analyzed.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of PTCH and Smo expressions in cancerous tissues were 71.4% (20/28) and 53.6% (15/28), respectively, whereas no expression in the nontumor pancreas tissues was found. Both PTCH and Smo expressions correlated with the low levels of tumor tissue differentiation (P < 0.05) and PTCH and Smo expressions in islet cells of cancerous tissues associated with hyperglycemia.

CONCLUSIONS:

Because aberrant expressions of PTCH and Smo were common in human pancreatic carcinoma tissues and were associated with the low-level differentiation of tumor tissue and hyperglycemia, this indicated that these molecules played a fundamental role in pancreas tumorigenesis and were regarded as new targets for diagnosis and treatment of human pancreatic cancer.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk