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J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2006 Jun;15(5):591-8.

Effects of HIV infection and its treatment on self-reported menstrual abnormalities in women.

Author information

  • 1Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield, Illinois 62794-9640, USA. LSMASSAD@ameritech.net

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To describe menstrual abnormalities among women with HIV.

METHODS:

Women in a multicenter prospective cohort study of HIV natural history reported menstrual abnormalities every 6-months between October 1994 and September 2002. Logistic regression and Cox proportional-hazards models were applied.

RESULTS:

The prevalence and incidence of menstrual abnormalities were <20%. HIV serostatus was not associated with prevalent menstrual abnormalities, but in HIV-seropositive women, higher CD4 counts were associated with fewer problems: compared with women with CD4 counts <200/mm3, in women with counts 200-500/mm3, odds ratio (OR) for amenorrhea was 0.55, p = 0.02, and for oligomenorrhea was 0.54, p = 0.0003; for women with counts >500/mm3, OR for amenorrhea was 0.67, p = 0.14, and for oligomenorrhea was 0.55, p = 0.001. HIV serostatus was not associated with incident abnormalities. Highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) use was not associated with prevalent abnormalities, but both HAART use and higher CD4 counts were linked to lower rates of incident menstrual problems.

CONCLUSIONS:

Compared with seronegative women, HIV-seropositive women are at increased risk for some menstrual changes, although the absolute frequency of most abnormalities is low. Higher CD4 counts and HAART protect against incident abnormalities.

PMID:
16796486
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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