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J Adolesc Health. 2006 Jul;39(1):119.e1-8.

Attitudes about intimate partner violence screening among an ethnically diverse sample of young women.

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  • 1Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University, New York, New York, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This clinic-based study investigated attitudes about intimate partner violence (IPV) screening among an ethnically diverse population of adolescent and young adult women (n = 645).

METHODS:

A cross-sectional quantitative and qualitative survey assessed experiences with and attitudes toward IPV screening.

RESULTS:

Almost all participants supported universal IPV screening and over 90% believed that a health care provider was the most appropriate adult to ask them about interpersonal violence. Young women's concerns toward screening varied by age and violence experience; those most likely to mind being screened were younger, had a history of childhood sexual abuse, and were victims of physical violence in the last year. However, even in these groups, over 70% supported IPV screening. Qualitative analyses suggested that provider qualities and confidentiality will affect the amount of disclosure to provider-initiated screening. Women also raised important questions about how to define IPV in relationships.

CONCLUSIONS:

Young women generally favor universal screening of interpersonal violence, but provider qualities and confidentiality issues affect responses to screening questions.

PMID:
16781970
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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