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Atherosclerosis. 2007 Jan;190(1):135-42. Epub 2006 Jun 14.

Concord grape juice attenuates platelet aggregation, serum cholesterol and development of atheroma in hypercholesterolemic rabbits.

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  • 1Department of Medicine, Section of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53792, United States.

Abstract

Intake of Concord grape juice (CGJ), rich in polyphenolics, inhibits platelet aggregation (PA), a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), in normocholesterolemic animals and humans. It is unclear whether CGJ can attenuate hypercholesterolemia-enhanced PA. The effects of daily CGJ consumption on hypercholesterolemia-enhanced PA and the development of atherosclerosis were investigated. Two groups of rabbits (Control and Treated; n=10 each) were fed a hypercholesterolemic diet for 48 days. Treated group then received supplemental CGJ (225mL/day) while Control group received supplemental iso-caloric sugar water for 48 days. Collagen-, collagen+epinephrine- and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced whole blood PA responses were measured on Days 0, 48 and 96; total serum cholesterol and blood pressure were also measured. The development of aortic atheroma was quantified at the end. Both groups showed significant increases in PA and serum cholesterol at Day 48. However, at Day 96, Treated group showed significantly lower PA and development of atheroma (30.7+/-3.9% lower (p<0.001)) than Control group; Treated group also had significantly lower total serum cholesterol and blood pressure than Control group. In conclusion, daily consumption of CGJ attenuates hypercholesterolemia-enhanced PA, blood pressure, total serum cholesterol and development of atheroma in rabbits.

PMID:
16780846
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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