Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
Atherosclerosis. 2007 Feb;190(2):452-8. Epub 2006 Jun 13.

Platelet membrane CD154 and sCD154 in progressive peripheral arterial disease: a pilot study.

Author information

  • 1University of Leeds Medical School, UK.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The expression and potential role of platelet membrane CD154 and sCD154 in atherosclerosis was investigated in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

METHODS:

This prospective observational study measured the expression of platelet-bound CD154 and soluble CD154 (sCD154) in 39 patients with critical limb ischaemia (CLI, n=15), stable intermittent claudication (SIC, n=12) and age-matched controls (AMC, n=12). Basal and agonist-stimulated CD154, P-selectin expression and fibrinogen binding was measured by whole blood flow cytometry, while sCD154 was measured in paired plasma samples by ELISA.

RESULTS:

Basal expression of CD154 on the platelet surface was enhanced in both groups of patients with peripheral arterial disease. However, the critical limb ischaemics showed the highest level of basal expression 0.7+/-0.3 [median+/-IQR] and was significantly increased compared to both stable intermittent claudicants and age-matched controls (P<0.001). On agonist stimulation with either ADP or thrombin critical limb ischaemics demonstrated greater platelet reactivity and propensity to express CD154 compared to age-matched controls (P<0.05). Confirmation of the cellular expression of CD154 results was obtained by measuring sCD154 concentrations in autologous plasma samples. Here plasma levels of sCD154 in critical limb ischaemics were significantly greater than both stable intermittent claudicants and age-matched controls (P<0.005).

CONCLUSIONS:

Enhanced basal platelet expression and increased propensity to express CD154 and sCD154 in critical limb ischaemics compared to both controls and patients with stable intermittent claudication support evidence for the role of CD154 in atherogenesis and suggest a novel function in progressive and acute peripheral arterial disease.

PMID:
16777115
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk