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Arthritis Res Ther. 2006;8(4):212.

Biology and therapy of fibromyalgia. New therapies in fibromyalgia.

Author information

  • Women's Health Research Program, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Piedmont Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio 45219, USA. Lesley.Arnold@uc.edu

Abstract

Fibromyalgia is a chronic, musculoskeletal pain condition that predominately affects women. Although fibromyalgia is common and associated with substantial morbidity and disability, there are no US Food and Drug Administration-approved treatments. However, progress has been made in identifying pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for fibromyalgia. Recent pharmacological treatment studies have focused on selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, which enhance serotonin and norepinephrine neurotransmission in the descending pain pathways and lack many of the adverse side effects associated with tricyclic medications. Promising results have also been reported for medications that bind to the alpha2delta subunit of voltage-gated calcium channels, resulting in decreased calcium influx at nerve terminals and subsequent reduction in the release of several neurotransmitters thought to play a role in pain processing. There is also evidence to support exercise, cognitive behavioral therapy, education, and social support in the management of fibromyalgia. It is likely that many patients would benefit from combinations of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments, but more study is needed.

PMID:
16762044
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1779399
Free PMC Article
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