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J Clin Immunol. 2006 Mar;26(2):177-85. Epub 2006 Apr 26.

Rapid subcutaneous IgG replacement therapy is effective and safe in children and adults with primary immunodeficiencies--a prospective, multi-national study.

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  • 1Department of Laboratory Medicine, Section of Clinical Immunology, The Swedish Centre for Immunodeficiencies, Karolinska Institutet at Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.


Sixty patients (16 children, 44 adults) participated in the study aiming at evaluating: (i) IgG levels when switching patients from intravenous IgG (IVIG) infusions in hospital to subcutaneous (SCIG) self-infusions at home using the same cumulative monthly dose, (ii) protections against infections, and (iii) safety of a new, ready-to-use 16% IgG preparation. All children and 33 adults had received IVIG therapy for >6 months at enrolment. Ten adults who had been on SCIG therapy for many years served as controls. Mean serum IgG trough levels increased in the pre-IVIG children from 7.8 to 9.2 g/L (non-inferiority: p < 0.001) and in the adults from 8.6 to 8.9 g/L (non-inferiority: p < 0.001). Totally 114 respiratory tract infections occurred, 90% of them mild. One serious bacterial infection (pneumonia) was reported for one adult. The annualized rate of serious infections was 0.04 episodes/patient. In total 2297 infusions were given and 28 (1%) systemic adverse reactions occurred, none of them severe. Local tissue reactions declined over time, this being particularly distinct after 8 to 10 weeks. In conclusion, the SCIG administration route was safe. High IgG levels were easily maintained resulting in a very good protection against infections.

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