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Osteoporos Int. 2006;17(7):1055-64. Epub 2006 May 4.

Coffee, tea and caffeine consumption in relation to osteoporotic fracture risk in a cohort of Swedish women.

Author information

  • 1Department of Toxicology, National Food Administration, P. O. Box 622, 75126 Uppsala, Sweden. heha@slv.se

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Consumption of coffee and tea, and total intake of caffeine has been claimed to be associated with osteoporotic fracture risk. However, results of earlier studies lack consistency.

METHODS:

We examined this relation in a cohort of 31,527 Swedish women aged 40-76 years at baseline in 1988. The consumption of coffee, caffeinated tea and the intake of caffeine were estimated from a self-administered food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Multivariate-adjusted hazards ratios (HRs) of fractures with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated by Cox proportional hazards models.

RESULTS:

During a mean follow-up of 10.3 years, we observed 3,279 cases with osteoporotic fractures. The highest (>330 mg/day) compared with the lowest (<200 mg/day) quintile of caffeine intake was associated with a modestly increased risk of fracture: HR 1.20 (95% CI: 1.07-1.35). A high coffee consumption significantly increased the risk of fracture (p for trend 0.002), whereas tea drinking was not associated with risk. The increased risk of fracture with both a high caffeine intake and coffee consumption was confined to women with a low calcium intake (<700 mg/day): HR 1.33 (95% CI: 1.07-1.65) with > or =4 cups (600 ml)/day of coffee compared to <1 cup (150 ml)/day. The same comparison but risk estimated for women with a high propensity for fractures (> or =2 fracture types) revealed a HR of 1.88 (95% CI: 1.17-3.00).

CONCLUSIONS:

In conclusion, our results indicate that a daily intake of 330 mg of caffeine, equivalent to 4 cups (600 ml) of coffee, or more may be associated with a modestly increased risk of osteoporotic fractures, especially in women with a low intake of calcium.

PMID:
16758142
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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