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Sex Transm Dis. 2007 Jan;34(1):1-8.

HIV-related risk behaviors and history of sexually transmitted diseases among male migrants who patronize commercial sex in China.

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  • 1The Carman and Ann Adams Department of Pediatrics Prevention Research Center, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48201, USA. bwang@med.wayne.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE:

Men who pay for sexual services are at increased risk for HIV/sexually transmitted disease. Data on the sociodemographic and behavioral characteristics of such men in China are limited.

STUDY DESIGN:

Two cross-sectional surveys, using similar instruments, were completed among Chinese migrants in Beijing, Shanghai, and Nanjing in 2002. A total of 1304 rural-to-urban migrant men from community settings ("community sample") and 465 migrant men attending sexually transmitted disease clinics ("STD clinic sample") were included in the current study.

RESULTS:

Ten percent of men in the community sample and 32.7% of men in the STD clinic sample reported having ever paid for sex. Nearly 20% of clients from the community sample and 60% of clients from the STD clinic sample reported a history of STDs. For both the community and STD clinic samples, working at industrial or construction sectors, multiple sexual partners, regular sex partner having sex with others, and a history of drug use were associated with being a male client. In addition, perceived peer sexual risk and perceived vulnerability to STD were associated with being a male client in the community sample, and a history of STD and being tested for STD/HIV were associated with being a male client in the STD sample.

CONCLUSION:

Male migrants who paid for sex in China were vulnerable to HIV/STDs. HIV prevention efforts should target young migrant men who work at factory and construction sectors. STD clinics may be important sites for outreach and intervention efforts among male clients.

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