Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Br J Psychiatry. 2006 Jun;188:574-80.

Cognitive stimulation therapy for people with dementia: cost-effectiveness analysis.

Author information

  • 1Personal Social Services Research Unit, London School of Economics, Houghton Street, London WC2A 2AE. m.knapp@lse.ac.uk

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Psychological therapy groups for people with dementia are widely used, but their cost-effectiveness has not been explored.

AIMS:

To investigate the cost-effectiveness of an evidence-based cognitive stimulation therapy (CST) programme for people with dementia as part of a randomised controlled trial.

METHOD:

A total of 91 people with dementia, living in care homes or the community, received a CST group intervention twice weekly for 8 weeks; 70 participants with dementia received treatment as usual. Service use was recorded 8 weeks before and during the 8-week intervention and costs were calculated. A cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted with cognition as the primary outcome, and quality of life as the secondary outcome. Cost-effectiveness acceptability curves were plotted.

RESULTS:

Cognitive stimulation therapy has benefits for cognition and quality of life in dementia, and costs were not different between the groups. Under reasonable assumptions, there is a high probability that CST is more cost-effective than treatment as usual, with regard to both outcome measures.

CONCLUSIONS:

Cognitive stimulation therapy for people with dementia has effectiveness advantages over, and may be more cost-effective than, treatment as usual.

PMID:
16738349
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk