Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Int J Urol. 2006 Apr;13(4):373-8.

Urodynamic evaluation of a suspension technique for rapid recovery of continence after radical retropubic prostatectomy.

Author information

  • 1Department of Urology, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, Japan. noguchi@med.kurume-u.ac.jp

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We investigated urodynamic findings involved in the rapid recovery of urinary continence after radical retropubic prostatectomy with a suspension technique.

METHODS:

A total of 45 consecutive patients (mean age 67.6 years) who had undergone radical retropubic prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer were evaluated with multichannel urodynamics including the maximal urethral pressure (MUP), functional urethral length (FUL), maximal cystometric capacity (MCC) and abdominal leak point pressure (ALPP) at base line, 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months postoperatively. The suspension of vesicourethral anastomosis preserving anterior attachments of puboprostatic ligaments to pubic bone was performed in 33 patients. Twelve patients did not undergo the suspension technique.

RESULTS:

The continence rates at 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months after radical prostatectomy in the suspension group were significantly higher than those in the non-suspension group: 67% versus 0% at 1 week (P < 0.001), 82% versus 25% at 1 month (P < 0.001), and 91% versus 50% at 3 months (P < 0.01), respectively. Postoperative ALPP at all points of measurement was significantly higher in the suspension group than in the non-suspension group (P < 0.0002). There was no difference in MUP, FUL or MCC at each point following radical prostatectomy between the two groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

These observations suggest that preserving anterior attachments of puboprostatic ligaments to pubic bone and fixation of urethral hyper-mobility by the suspension of vesicourethral anastomosis promotes rapid recovery of urinary continence after radical retropubic prostatectomy.

PMID:
16734853
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for Blackwell Publishing
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk