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J Adolesc Health. 2006 Jun;38(6):753.e9-18.

The influence of individual characteristics and contraceptive beliefs on parent-teen sexual communications: a structural model.

Author information

  • 1Title X/Region V Family Planning Training Program, MPRES, Inc., Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA. cswain@mpres.org

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To explore relationships between parent and teen demographic characteristics, parent beliefs about the effectiveness, safety and usability of condoms and oral contraceptives, and parent-teen sexual communication.

METHODS:

One thousand parents of 13-17-year-olds were surveyed. Structural equation modeling was used to test direct and indirect relationships between parent and teen characteristics, parent effectiveness beliefs, and amount of parent-teen communication about the negative consequences of sex and where to obtain birth control.

RESULTS:

Parent effectiveness beliefs were directly related to parent-teen communication levels. Minority, religious, politically conservative, and low income parents reported lower effectiveness beliefs than other parent groups. Low income, minority parents reported more discussion with their teens about the negative consequences of sex and where to obtain birth control than high income, White parents. Politically conservative, religious parents reported more discussion with their teen about the negative consequences of sex than their liberal and nonreligious counterparts. In general, nonreligious parents reported more discussion about where to obtain birth control than religious parents. Parents were less likely to talk with males, younger teens, and teens not believed to be romantically involved. Parent and teen gender interacted to predict the amount of parent-teen communication.

CONCLUSIONS:

Parent beliefs about condom and oral contraceptive efficacy, safety and usability related directly to amount of parent-teen sexual communication. Parent beliefs and communication levels varied across a number of demographic groups. Educating parent groups may result in more frequent and accurate sexual communications with their teenage children.

PMID:
16730607
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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