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Kidney Int. 2006 Jul;70(1):199-203. Epub 2006 May 17.

Urinary IL-18 is an early predictive biomarker of acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery.

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  • 1Section of Nephrology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06516, USA. chirag.parikh@yale.edu

Abstract

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent complication of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). The lack of early biomarkers for AKI has impaired our ability to intervene in a timely manner. Urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is recently demonstrated as an early biomarker of AKI after CPB, increasing 25-fold within 2 h and declining 6 h after surgery. In the present study, we tested whether interleukin-18 (IL-18) is a predictive biomarker for AKI in the same group of patients following CPB. Exclusion criteria included pre-existing renal insufficiency and nephrotoxin use. Serial urine samples were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for IL-18 in 20 patients who developed AKI (defined as a 50% or greater increase in serum creatinine after CPB) and 35 controls (age, race, and gender-matched patients who did not develop AKI after CPB). Using serum creatinine, AKI was detected only 48-72 h after CPB. In contrast, urine IL-18 increased at 4-6 h after CPB, peaked at over 25-fold at 12 h, and remained markedly elevated up to 48 h after CPB. The performance of IL-18 as demonstrated by area under the receiver operating characteristics curve for diagnosis of AKI at 4, 12, and 24 h after CPB was 61, 75, and 73% respectively. Also, on multivariate analysis, both IL-18 and NGAL were independently associated with number of days in AKI among cases. Our results indicate that IL-18 is an early, predictive biomarker of AKI after CPB, and that NGAL and IL-18 are increased in tandem after CPB. The combination of these two biomarkers may allow for the reliable early diagnosis and prognosis of AKI at all times after CPB, much before the rise in serum creatinine.

PMID:
16710348
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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