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J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2006 Sep;77(9):1017-20. Epub 2006 May 11.

Bilateral grey-matter increase in the putamen in primary blepharospasm.

Author information

  • 1Department of Neurology, Technische Universität München, München, Germany. thorleif.etgen@klinikum-traunstein.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Primary blepharospasm is a focal dystonia characterised by excessive involuntary closure of the eyelids. The pathophysiology of primary blepharospasm is unresolved.

AIM:

To pinpoint grey-matter changes that are associated with primary blepharospasm.

METHODS:

16 right-handed patients with primary blepharospasm (mean age 67.4 (SD 4.3) years; 12 women) were compared with 16 healthy volunteers matched for sex and age. High-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of each participant was obtained and analysed by voxel-based morphometry, a method to detect regionally specific differences in grey matter between patients and control group. To evaluate whether the identified grey-matter changes were correlated with the duration of primary blepharospasm or botulinum neurotoxin treatment (BoNT), separate regression analyses were carried out.

RESULTS:

In patients with primary blepharospasm, grey-matter increase in the putamina was observed, whereas regression analyses did not indicate a correlation between grey-matter increases and the duration of primary blepharospasm or BoNT. Grey-matter decrease was detected in the left inferior parietal lobule; here regression analyses of grey-matter decrease showed a significant (p = 0.013) correlation of grey-matter decrease with the duration of BoNT.

CONCLUSIONS:

The data suggest structural changes in primary blepharospasm and point to a crucial role of the putamen for the pathophysiology of this focal dystonia.

PMID:
16690695
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2077759
Free PMC Article
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