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J Card Fail. 2006 May;12(4):281-5.

B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels and ethnic disparities in perceived severity of heart failure: results from the Rapid Emergency Department Heart Failure Outpatient Trial (REDHOT) multicenter study of BNP levels and emergency department decision making in patients presenting with shortness of breath.

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  • 1University of California at San Diego, California, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Previous studies have shown that in patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with heart failure, there is a disconnect between the perceived severity of congestive heart failure (CHF) by physicians and the severity as determined by B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels. Whether ethnicity plays a role in this discrepancy is unknown.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

The Rapid Emergency Department Heart Failure Outpatient Trial (REDHOT) was a 10-center trial of 464 patients seen in the ED with acute dyspnea and BNP level higher than 100 pg/mL on arrival. Physicians were blinded to BNP levels. Patients were followed for 90 days after discharge. A total of 151 patients identified themselves as white (32.5%) and 294 as black (63.4%). Of these, 90% were hospitalized. African Americans were more likely to be perceived as New York Heart Association class I or II than whites (P = .01). Blacks who were discharged from the ED had higher median BNP levels than whites who were discharged (1293 vs. 533, P = .004). The median BNP of blacks who were discharged was actually higher than the median BNP of blacks who were admitted (1293 vs. 769, P = .04); the same did not hold true for whites. BNP was predictive of 90-day outcome in both blacks and whites; however, perceived severity of CHF, race, and ED disposition did not contribute to the prediction of events.

CONCLUSION:

In patients presenting to the ED with heart failure, the disconnect between perceived severity of CHF and severity as determined by BNP levels is most pronounced in African Americans.

PMID:
16679261
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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