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Plant Physiol. 1988 May;87(1):226-31.

Enhancement of the Stomatal Response to Blue Light by Red Light, Reduced Intercellular Concentrations of CO(2), and Low Vapor Pressure Differences.

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  • 1Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305.

Abstract

The effects of environmental parameters on the blue light response of stomata were studied by quantifying transient increases in stomatal conductance in Commelina communis following 15 seconds by 0.100 millimole per square meter per second pulses of blue light. Because conductance increases were not observed following red light pulses of the same or greater (30 seconds by 0.200 millimole per square meter per second) fluences, the responses observed could be reliably attributed to the specific blue light response of the guard cells, rather than to guard cell chlorophyll. In both Paphiopedilum harrisianum, which lacks guard cell chloroplasts, and Commelina, the blue light response was enhanced by 0.263 millimole per square meter per second continuous background red light. Thus, the blue light response and its enhancement do not require energy derived from red-light-driven photophosphorylation by the guard cell chloroplasts. In Commelina, reduction of the intercellular concentration of CO(2) by manipulation of ambient CO(2) concentrations resulted in an enhanced blue light response. In both Commelina and Paphiopedilum, the blue light response was decreased by an increased vapor pressure difference. The magnitude of blue-light-specific stomatal opening thus appears to be sensitive to environmental conditions that affect the carbon and water status of the plant.

PMID:
16666108
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC1054730
Free PMC Article
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