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Plant Physiol. 1986 Jan;80(1):63-7.

Acclimation to High CO(2) in Monoecious Cucumbers : II. Carbon Exchange Rates, Enzyme Activities, and Starch and Nutrient Concentrations.

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  • 1Department of Horticultural Science, North Carolina State University, Box 7609, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7609.

Abstract

Carbon exchange capacity of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) germinated and grown in controlled environment chambers at 1000 microliters per liter CO(2) decreased from the vegetative growth stage to the fruiting stage, during which time capacity of plants grown at 350 microliters per liter increased. Carbon exchange rates (CERs) measured under growth conditions during the fruiting period were, in fact, lower in plants grown at 1000 microliters per liter CO(2) than those grown at 350. Progressive decreases in CERs in 1000 microliters per liter plants were associated with decreasing stomatal conductances and activities of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase and carbonic anhydrase. Leaf starch concentrations were higher in 1000 microliters per liter CO(2) grown-plants than in 350 microliters per liter grown plants but calcium and nitrogen concentrations were lower, the greatest difference occurring at flowering. Sucrose synthase and sucrose-P-synthase activities were similar in 1000 microliters per liter compared to 350 microliters per liter plants during vegetative growth and flowering but higher in 350 microliters per liter plants at fruiting. The decreased carbon exchange rates observed in this cultivar at 1000 microliters per liter CO(2) could explain the lack of any yield increase (MM Peet 1986 Plant Physiol 80: 59-62) when compared with plants grown at 350 microliters per liter.

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