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Respir Med. 2006 Dec;100(12):2183-9. Epub 2006 May 2.

Characterisation of the onset and presenting clinical features of adult bronchiectasis.

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  • 1Department of Respiratory Medicine, Monash Medical Centre, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. paul.king@med.monash.edu.au

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There is little information available on the features of initial presentation of bronchiectasis and documentation of the onset and progress of symptoms leading up to this. Therefore a study was performed on a large cohort of adult patients presenting to Monash Medical Centre (MMC) to survey the course of their disease up to the time of diagnosis.

OBJECTIVES:

To characterise the onset and presenting clinical features of bronchiectasis in adults.

METHODS:

A cross-sectional study of 103 adults presenting to a tertiary referral hospital with newly diagnosed bronchiectasis. Clinical features of bronchiectasis and results of spirometry, sputum microbiology and radiology were assessed and correlated.

RESULTS:

Most patients had idiopathic bronchiectasis (74%) and did not have other significant disease. The dominant symptom was chronic productive cough present in 98% of patients with other important symptoms being chronic rhinosinusitis (70%), dyspnoea (62%), and fatigue (74%). Most patients had had a chronic productive cough for over 30 years prior to diagnosis and over 80% of patients had chronic respiratory symptoms from childhood. The dominant finding on physical examination was the presence of crackles which were generally bi-basal. Spirometry showed mild airway obstruction with an average forced expiratory volume in 1s of the cohort of 76% predicted. Radiologic imaging generally showed multilobar disease (80%).

CONCLUSIONS:

The typical profile of bronchiectasis in this group of patients was of longstanding productive cough, rhinosinusitis and fatigue in non-smokers with crackles on chest auscultation.

PMID:
16650970
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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