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J Am Diet Assoc. 2006 May;106(5):698-705.

Psychological predictors of physical activity in the diabetes prevention program.

Author information

  • 1Diabetes Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. ldelahanty@partners.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To identify the baseline psychological variables before receiving a Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) lifestyle intervention that predict physical activity levels (PALs) at baseline, 1 year, and end of study (2 to 3 years after randomization).

DESIGN AND SUBJECTS:

Of the final 293 DPP lifestyle participants randomized, 274 (94%) completed validated questionnaires at baseline assessing stage of change for PAL, exercise self-efficacy, perceived stress, depression, and anxiety.

STATISTICAL ANALYSES PERFORMED:

Correlations and stepwise multiple regression analyses.

RESULTS:

At baseline, this subset was similar to the entire DPP lifestyle cohort: mean age was 52.5 years, 65% were women, and mean PAL was 15.7 metabolic equivalent hours per week. Higher levels of baseline leisure PAL correlated with greater readiness to change PAL (r=0.44, P<0.0001), higher exercise self-efficacy (r=0.18, P=0.002), and lower levels of perceived stress (r=-0.16, P=0.009), depression (r=-0.18, P=0.003), and anxiety (r=-0.14, P=0.03), with similar correlations at 1 year and end of study. In multivariate models, being a man, lower levels of depression, and lower body mass index were independent correlates of higher baseline leisure PAL; being a man, greater baseline exercise self-efficacy, and activity level were independent correlates of greater leisure PAL levels at 1 year and end of study. Greater readiness to change PAL at baseline was also an independent correlate of greater PAL at end of study.

CONCLUSIONS:

In this representative sample of DPP lifestyle participants, being a man, lower body mass index, greater readiness for change in PAL, higher exercise self-efficacy, and lower perceived stress, depression, and anxiety scores correlated with higher levels of baseline PAL with similar patterns at 1 year and end of study. These findings may help determine which patients are most likely to increase PAL in lifestyle intervention programs.

PMID:
16647327
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2495077
Free PMC Article
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