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Am Heart J. 2006 May;151(5):999-1005.

How obesity affects the cut-points for B-type natriuretic peptide in the diagnosis of acute heart failure. Results from the Breathing Not Properly Multinational Study.

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  • 1University of California, San Diego, CA, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is valuable in diagnosing heart failure (HF), but its utility in obese patients is unknown. Studies have suggested a cut-point of BNP > or = 100 pg/mL for the diagnosis of HF; however, there is an inverse relation between BNP levels and body mass index. We evaluated differential cut-points for BNP in diagnosing acute HF across body mass index levels to determine whether alternative cut-points can improve diagnosis.

METHODS:

The Breathing Not Properly Multinational Study was a 7-center, prospective study of 1586 patients who presented to the Emergency Department with acute dyspnea. B-type natriuretic peptide was measured on arrival. Height and weight data were available for 1368 participants. The clinical diagnosis of HF was adjudicated by 2 independent cardiologists who were blinded to BNP results.

RESULTS:

Heart failure was the final diagnosis in 46.1%. Mean BNP levels (pg/mL) in lean, overweight/obese, and severely/morbidly obese patients were 643, 462, and 247 for patients with acute HF, and 52, 35, and 25 in those without HF, respectively (P < .05 for all comparisons except 35 vs 25). B-type natriuretic peptide cut-points to maintain 90% sensitivity for a HF diagnosis were 170 pg/mL for lean subjects, 110 pg/mL for overweight/obese subjects, and 54 pg/mL in severely/morbidly obese patients.

CONCLUSIONS:

Body mass index influences the selection of cut-points for BNP in diagnosing acute HF. A lower cut-point (BNP > or = 54 pg/mL) should be used in severely obese patients to preserve sensitivity. A higher cut-point in lean patients (BNP > or = 170 pg/mL) could be used to increase specificity.

PMID:
16644321
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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