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Anal Chem. 2006 Apr 15;78(8):2646-50.

Circular dichroism thermal lens microscope for sensitive chiral analysis on microchip.

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  • 1Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan.

Abstract

A novel chiral detector, a circular-dichroism thermal lens microscope (CD-TLM), was developed to realize sensitive and selective detection of small volume chiral samples on a microchip. To realize chiral recognition on TLM, an excitation beam was phase-modulated at a frequency of 1.2 kHz, and left-circularly polarized light (LCPL) and right-circularly polarized light (RCPL) were generated. Then, the differential light absorption between LCPL and RCPL, which is the CD effect, was detected as thermal lens signal intensity and phase. As a standard sample, optically active tris(ethylenediamine)cobalt(III) [Co-(en)3]3+I3- aqueous solutions were used for performance evaluations. First, we verified the basic principle for selective chiral analysis by comparing the signals in intensity-modulation and phase-modulation modes of the excitation beam. Also, we found that the g-factor, which is significant for determining enantiomeric excess, agreed well with the value obtained by the CD spectrometer. The limit of detection (LOD) for enantiopure [Co-(en)3]3+I3- was 6.3 x 10(-5) M (1.9 x 10(-7) abs) for (-)-Co(en)3(3+), and the sensitivity in absorbance units was more than 250 times higher than that in a CD spectrophotometer. Finally, we demonstrated enantiomeric excess determination on a microchip. The LOD was 1.7% (8.5 x 10(-7) abs) for (-)-Co(en)3(3+) and at least one order superior to the LOD of a CD spectrometer. The applicability of CD-TLM for sensitive chiral analysis on a microchip was verified, and CD-TLM is expected to be promising for microchip-based chiral synthesis and analysis systems.

PMID:
16615775
[PubMed]
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