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Ethn Dis. 2006 Winter;16(1):16-21.

Sleep disturbance mediates the relationship between perceived racism and depressive symptoms.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychology, Brigham Young University; 284 Taylor Building; Provo, UT 84602-8626, USA. steffen@byu.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To examine the effects of racism on sleep disturbance and depression and to examine whether sleep disturbance mediates the effects of racism on depression.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional questionnaire study.

SETTING:

Community.

PARTICIPANTS:

168 Hispanic-American immigrants, 45% female, average age 33 years, average length of time living in the United States was 5 years.

MEASURES:

The Perceived Racism Scale for Latinos, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (CES-D) Scale.

RESULTS:

Using hierarchical linear regression analyses, perceived racism was related to increased sleep disturbance (b=.21, P<.01) and higher levels of depressive symptoms (b=.24, P<.01). When sleep disturbance was included in the regression equation, perceived racism was no longer a significant predictor of depressive symptoms (b=.10, nonsignificant), indicating that sleep disturbance mediated the relationship between perceived racism and depressive symptoms.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study adds to the research literature by identifying sleep disturbance as a potential pathway through which perceived racism may affect health.

PMID:
16599343
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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