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Clin Infect Dis. 2006 May 1;42(9):1325-32. Epub 2006 Mar 31.

Endothelial function in HIV-infected persons.

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  • 1Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Several reports have suggested an increased risk of coronary disease in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients receiving protease inhibitors (PIs). Impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation is a putative surrogate marker of coronary atherosclerotic disease.

METHODS:

The present study evaluated the effect of HIV infection and antiretroviral treatment on endothelial vasomotor function, by assessing brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD). A total of 75 HIV-infected patients were compared with 223 control subjects who were presumed to be HIV uninfected.

RESULTS:

HIV-infected patients had significantly impaired FMD, compared with control subjects (mean +/- SD, 7.3% +/- 4.4% vs. 11.1% +/- 6.3%; P < .0001). When adjustments were made for smoking status, sex, and body mass index, the difference between the 2 groups remained statistically significant (P < .01). In a cross-sectional analysis of the HIV-infected patients, we found significant associations between FMD and current injection drug use, hazardous drinking, HIV load, and alpha-high-density lipoprotein triglyceride levels, but not PI therapy. In a multivariate analysis, only current injection drug use and a lower alpha-high-density lipoprotein triglyceride level were significantly associated with FMD.

CONCLUSIONS:

HIV-infected patients have significant impairment of endothelial function, and this impairment is worse among those with elevated levels of HIV replication, particularly injection drug users.

Comment in

PMID:
16586393
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2737346
Free PMC Article
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