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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2006 Apr;160(4):363-8.

Does children's screen time predict requests for advertised products? Cross-sectional and prospective analyses.

Author information

  • 1Division of General Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics and Stanford Prevention Research Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, 750 Welch Road, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA. lchamberlain@stanford.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine children's screen media exposure and requests for advertised toys and food/drinks.

DESIGN:

Prospective cohort study.

SETTING:

Twelve elementary schools in northern California.

PARTICIPANTS:

Eight hundred twenty-seven third grade children participated at baseline; 386 students in 6 schools were followed up for 20 months.

INTERVENTION:

None.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Child self-reported requests for advertised toys and foods/drinks.

RESULTS:

At baseline, children's screen media time was significantly associated with concurrent requests for advertised toys (Spearman r = 0.15 [TV viewing] and r = 0.20 [total screen time]; both P<.001) and foods/drinks (Spearman r = 0.16 [TV viewing] and r = 0.18 [total screen time]; both P<.001). In prospective analysis, children's screen media time at baseline was significantly associated with their mean number of toy requests 7 to 20 months later (Spearman r = 0.21 [TV viewing] and r = 0.24 [total screen time]; both P<.001) and foods/drinks requests (Spearman r = 0.14 [TV viewing] and r = 0.16 [total screen time]; both P<.01). After adjusting for baseline requests and sociodemographic variables, the relationship between screen media exposure and future requests for advertised foods/drinks remained significant for total TV viewing and total screen media exposure. The relationship with future requests for toys remained significant for total screen media exposure.

CONCLUSIONS:

Screen media exposure is a prospective risk factor for children's requests for advertised products. Future experimental studies on children's health- and consumer-related outcomes are warranted.

PMID:
16585480
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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