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Scand J Public Health. 2006;34(2):209-16.

Psychosocial work conditions, unemployment, and leisure-time physical activity: a population-based study.

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  • 1Department of Community Medicine, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the association between psychosocial work conditions and unemployment, and low leisure-time physical activity.

DESIGN/SETTING/PARTICIPANTS/MEASUREMENTS:

The 2000 public health survey in Scania is a cross-sectional postal questionnaire study with a 59% participation rate. A total of 5,180 persons aged 18-64 years who belonged to the workforce and the unemployed were included in this study. Logistic regression models were used to investigate the associations between psychosocial factors at work and unemployment, and low leisure-time physical activity. Psychosocial conditions at work were defined according to the Karasek-Theorell demand-control/decision latitudes into relaxed, active, passive, and job strain categories. The multivariate analyses included age, country of birth, education, economic stress, and social participation.

RESULTS:

In total, 16.1% of men and 14.8% of women had low leisure-time physical activity. The job strain (high demands/low control) and unemployed categories had significantly higher odds ratios of low leisure-time physical activity among both men and women compared with the relaxed (low demands/high control) reference category. However, the significant differences between the job strain, the unemployed, and the relaxed categories disappeared in the multivariate models.

CONCLUSIONS:

Respondents with job strain or unemployment have significantly higher odds ratios of low leisure-time physical activity than the relaxed category. However, after adjustments for education in particular the differences disappear. Nevertheless, the results suggest that the association between psychosocial work conditions, which are often dependent on education, and leisure-time physical activity may be interesting to study in more detail.

PMID:
16581714
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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