Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
Curr Biol. 2006 Apr 4;16(7):680-6.

Loss of glial lazarillo, a homolog of apolipoprotein D, reduces lifespan and stress resistance in Drosophila.

Author information

  • 1Departamento de Bioquímica y Fisiología y Genética Molecular-IBGM, Universidad de Valladolid-CSIC, Spain.

Abstract

The vertebrate Apolipoprotein D (ApoD) is a lipocalin secreted from subsets of neurons and glia during neural development and aging . A strong correlation exists between ApoD overexpression and numerous nervous system pathologies as well as obesity, diabetes, and many forms of cancer . However, the exact relationship between the function of ApoD and the pathophysiology of these diseases is still unknown. We have generated loss-of-function Drosophila mutants for the Glial Lazarillo (GLaz) gene , a homolog of ApoD in the fruit fly, mainly expressed in subsets of adult glial cells. The absence of GLaz reduces the organism's resistance to oxidative stress and starvation and shortens male lifespan. The mutant flies exhibit a smaller body mass due to a lower amount of neutral lipids stored in the fat body. Apoptotic neural cell death increases in aged flies or upon paraquat treatment, which also impairs neural function as assessed by behavioral tests. The higher sensitivity to oxidative stress and starvation and the reduced fat storage revert to control levels when a GFP-GLaz fusion protein is expressed under the control of the GLaz natural promoter. Finally, GLaz mutants have a higher concentration of lipid peroxidation products, pointing to a lipid peroxidation protection or scavenging as the mechanism of action for this lipocalin. In agreement with Walker et al. (, in this issue of Current Biology), who analyze the effects of overexpressing GLaz, we conclude that GLaz has a protective role in stress situations and that its absence reduces lifespan and accelerates neurodegeneration.

PMID:
16581513
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk