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Growth Horm IGF Res. 2006 Apr;16(2):101-7. Epub 2006 Apr 3.

Uncontrolled acromegaly is associated with progressive mitral valvular regurgitation.

Author information

  • 1Department of Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases C4-R, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden, The Netherlands. a.a.van_der_klaauw@lumc.nl

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Recent cross-sectional studies have documented an association between acromegaly and regurgitant valvular heart disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the change in prevalence of valvular heart disease in relation to the clinical activity, because the natural history of valvular changes in acromegaly is unknown.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Valvular regurgitation was assessed in 37 acromegalic patients (18 patients with active disease, and 19 with controlled disease) by conventional two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography before and after an interval of 1.9 years (range 1.5-3.0 years).

RESULTS:

At baseline, valvular regurgitation (mitral and aortic sites combined) was present in 46% of the patients and increased to 67% at follow-up (P=0.008). Mitral regurgitation increased significantly from 32% to 60% (P=0.002), but no change was noted for the aortic valve (27% vs. 31%, NS). In patients with active disease, valvular regurgitation increased significantly from 56% at baseline to 88% at follow-up (P=0.031) due to a significant increase of mitral regurgitation from 39% to 78% at follow-up (P=0.016). In contrast, no increase in valvular regurgitation was found in patients with controlled disease.

CONCLUSION:

The prevalence of mitral, but not aortic, valvular regurgitation increased in patients with active acromegaly during follow-up. Patients with acromegaly require adequate cardiac evaluation and follow-up to establish the extent and progression of valvular involvement.

PMID:
16580860
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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