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Biol Psychiatry. 2007 Feb 1;61(3):359-66. Epub 2006 Mar 29.

Estrogen deficient male mice develop compulsive behavior.

Author information

  • 1Prince Henry's Institute of Medical Research, Monash University, Clayton, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Aromatase converts androgen to estrogen. Thus, the aromatase knockout (ArKO) mouse is estrogen deficient. We investigated the compulsive behaviors of these animals and the protein levels of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) in frontal cortex, hypothalamus and liver.

METHODS:

Grooming was analyzed during the 20-min period immediately following a water-mist spray. Running wheel activity over two consecutive nights and barbering were analyzed. COMT protein levels were measured by Western analysis.

RESULTS:

Six-month old male but not female ArKO mice develop compulsive behaviors such as excessive barbering, grooming and wheel-running. Excessive activities were reversed by 3 weeks of 17beta-estradiol replacement. Interestingly, the presentation of compulsive behaviors is accompanied by concomitant decreases (p < .05) in hypothalamic COMT protein levels in male ArKO mice. These values returned to normal upon 17beta-estradiol treatment. In contrast, hepatic and frontal cortex COMT levels were not affected by the estrogen status, indicating region- and tissue-specific regulation of COMT levels by estrogen. No differences in COMT levels were detectable between female animals of both genotypes.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study describes the novel observation of a possible link between estrogen, COMT and development of compulsive behaviors in male animals which may have therapeutic implications in obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) patients.

PMID:
16566897
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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