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Clin Neurophysiol. 2006 May;117(5):1113-29. Epub 2006 Mar 27.

Frontal white matter volume and delta EEG sources negatively correlate in awake subjects with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

Author information

  • 1Dipartimento di Fisiologia Umana e Farmacologia, University La Sapienza, Rome, Italy. claudio.babiloni@uniroma1.it

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

A relationship between brain atrophy and delta rhythmicity (1.5-4 Hz) has been previously explored in Alzheimer's disease (AD) subjects [Fernandez A, Arrazola J, Maestu F, Amo C, Gil-Gregorio P, Wienbruch C, Ortiz T. Correlations of hippocampal atrophy and focal low-frequency magnetic activity in Alzheimer disease: volumetric MR imaging-magnetoencephalographic study. Am J Neuroradiol. 2003 24(3):481-487]. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that such a relationship does exist not only in AD patients but also across the continuum of subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and AD.

METHODS:

Resting, eyes-closed EEG data were recorded in 34 MCI and 65 AD subjects. EEG rhythms of interest were delta (2-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha 1 (8-10.5 Hz), alpha 2 (10.5-13 Hz), beta 1 (13-20 Hz), and beta 2 (20-30 Hz). EEG cortical sources were estimated by LORETA. Cortical EEG sources were correlated with MR-based measurements of lobar brain volume (white and gray matter).

RESULTS:

A negative correlation was observed between the frontal white matter and the amplitude of frontal delta sources (2-4 Hz) across MCI and AD subjects.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results confirmed for the first time the hypothesis that the sources of resting delta rhythms (2-4 Hz) are correlated with lobar brain volume across MCI and AD subjects.

SIGNIFICANCE:

The present findings support, at least at group level, the 'transition hypothesis' of brain structural and functional continuity between MCI and AD.

PMID:
16564740
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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