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Waste Manag. 2007;27(1):44-58. Epub 2006 Mar 23.

Hydro-mechanical behavior of municipal solid waste subject to leachate recirculation in a large-scale compression reactor cell.

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  • 1Environment, Energy and Waste Research Center (CREED), 291, avenue Dreyfous Ducas, 78520 Limay, France. franck.olivier@ujf-grenoble.fr

Abstract

The paper presents the results of a laboratory experiment on Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) subjected to one-dimensional compression in a 1 m3 instrumented cell. The focus was on the hydro-mechanical behavior of the material under conditions of confinement and leachate percolation that replicate those found in real-scale landfills. The operation of the apparatus is detailed together with the testing methodology and the monitoring program. Two samples of waste were tested: the first extended over a period of 10 months ('Control Test') and the second for 22 months ('Enhanced Test' with leachate recirculation). Consolidation data is reported with regard to both short-term (stress-dependent) and long-term (time-dependent) settlements. A discussion follows based on the derived values of primary and secondary compression ratios. Correlations between compression parameters and the biodegradation process are presented. In particular, results clearly highlight the effect of leachate recirculation on waste settlement: 24% secondary deformation reached after slightly less than 2 years (equivalent to a 5-fold increase in compressibility) and 17.9% loss of dry matter. Comparisons are proposed considering the results derived from the few monitoring programs conducted on experimental bioreactors worldwide. Finally, the hydraulic characterization of waste is discussed with regard to the evaluation of effective porosity and permeability.

PMID:
16563727
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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