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J Athl Train. 1997 Oct;32(4):315-9.

Hepatitis B Immunization of Athletic Trainers in NATA District IX.

Author information

  • 1Jason W. Coorts is Graduate Assistant Athletic Trainer at Middle Tennessee State University.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Preventive measures for transmission of bloodborne pathogens in athletic training should include hepatitis B virus (HBV) immunization of all certified athletic training staff and all student athletic trainers. Previously, no research has been undertaken to examine if athletic training programs follow these recommendations. The intent of this study was to investigate the number of certified athletic trainers (ATCs) and student athletic trainers (SATs) in the collegiate athletic training setting who have been immunized against HBV.

DESIGN AND SETTING:

Surveys were sent to all four-year institutions (n=173) in the National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) District IX. Both certified and student athletic trainers at each institution were instructed to complete and return surveys.

SUBJECTS:

Certified and student athletic trainers working in four-year colleges and universities in the states (n=7) belonging to NATA District IX.

MEASUREMENTS:

Returned surveys were evaluated by simple descriptive statistics for prevalence of ATC and SAT immunization. Other variables examined on surveys were how immunizations were paid for, amount of contact with bloodborne pathogens, use of protective barriers when in contact with bodily fluids, and differences in immunization practices according to athletic affiliation.

RESULTS:

One hundred and six (61%) institutions returned 599 surveys. Of 375 SATs returning surveys, 189 (50%) identified themselves as immunized, while 168 of 223 (75%) ATCs claimed to be immunized.

CONCLUSIONS:

According to the findings of this study, more emphasis should be placed on HBV immunization in the collegiate athletic training setting for the prevention of infection, especially with regard to SATs.

PMID:
16558465
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC1320347
Free PMC Article
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