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Int J Cancer. 2006 Aug 15;119(4):888-93.

Cancer risk among patients with condylomata acuminata.

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  • 1Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

Condylomata acuminata have been shown to increase the risk of anogenital cancers. However, previous studies have been of limited sample size and/or short follow-up duration, which prevent precise estimates of long-term excess risk, especially for specific cancer sites. We estimated the risk of specific cancers in a large cohort of hospitalized patients with condylomata acuminata, as recorded in the Swedish Inpatient Register between 1965 and 1999. Altogether, 10,971 patients (1,685 men and 9,286 women) were followed through 1999 for a median of 13 years. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR)--the ratio of the observed number of cancers to the number expected on the basis of the incidence in the Swedish population at large--was used as a measure of relative risk. After excluding the first-year of follow-up, we observed 43 cases of anogenital cancer in women, and 7 cases in men. Risks were elevated for cancers of the vulva (N = 13, SIR = 10.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 5.4-17.4), vagina (N = 4, SIR = 12.0, 95% CI = 3.3-30.7) and penis (N = 5, SIR = 21.9, 95% CI = 7.1-51.2). There was a moderate excess risk of cervical cancer in situ (N = 259, SIR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.7-2.1), but not invasive cervical cancer. Excess risks of esophageal, buccal cavity, nonmelanoma skin, lung and bladder cancers, and Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, were also observed in both men and women. In conclusion, condylomata acuminata are strongly associated with increased risk of cancers of the vulva, vagina, penis and anus, as well as some nonanogenital malignancies, but not invasive cervical cancer.

Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

PMID:
16557590
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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