Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Clin Periodontol. 2006 Apr;33(4):241-53.

The effect of smoking on periodontal treatment response: a review of clinical evidence.

Author information

  • 1School of Dental Sciences, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Smoking has been identified as a significant risk factor for periodontal diseases and is regarded as being responsible for incomplete or delayed healing in patients following treatment.

AIM AND METHOD:

The aim of this conventional review was to review, collate and tabulate the relative effectiveness of treatments of chronic periodontitis in smokers, non-smokers and ex-smokers.

OBSERVATIONS:

The majority of clinical trials show significantly greater reductions in probing depths and bleeding on probing, and significantly greater gain of clinical attachment following non-surgical and surgical treatments in non-smokers compared with smokers. This benefit is also seen at class I and II furcation sites and in patients prescribed systemic or local antimicrobial treatments.

CONCLUSIONS:

Data from epidemiological, cross-sectional and case-control studies strongly suggest that quitting smoking is beneficial to patients following periodontal treatments. The periodontal status of ex-smokers following treatment suggests that quitting the habit is beneficial although there are only limited data from long-term longitudinal clinical trials to demonstrate unequivocally the periodontal benefit of quitting smoking.

PMID:
16553633
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Blackwell Publishing
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk