Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Am J Hum Genet. 1991 Sep;49(3):668-73.

A unique mutation in the vitamin D receptor gene in three Japanese patients with vitamin D-dependent rickets type II: utility of single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis for heterozygous carrier detection.

Author information

  • 1Department of Pediatrics, University of Tokushima School of Medicine, Japan.

Abstract

Vitamin D-dependent rickets type II is a hereditary disease resulting from a defective vitamin D receptor. In three Japanese patients with vitamin D-dependent rickets type II whose fibroblasts displayed normal cytosol binding and impaired nuclear uptake of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, western, Southern, and northern analyses failed to disclose any abnormalities in vitamin D3 receptor protein and its gene. Exons 2 and 3 of the vitamin D receptor cDNA, which encode the DNA-binding domain consisting of two zinc fingers, were amplified by PCR and sequenced to identify the specific mutations in the vitamin D receptor gene. In the three patients and one normal control a T-to-C transition was found in the putative initiation codon, while this transition was not observed in another normal control. This finding suggested that an original initiation codon was located at positions 10-12 in the human vitamin D receptor cDNA sequence reported previously. In contrast, a unique G-to-A transition at position 140 in exon 3, resulting in substitution of arginine by glutamine at residue 47, was revealed only in these three patients. The arginine at 47 is located between two zinc fingers and is conserved within all steroid hormone receptors. Therefore, it is highly conceivable that this amino acid substitution is responsible for the defect of the vitamin D receptor in the patients. Single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of amplified DNA confirmed that all patients were homozygous and that parents from one family were heterozygous carriers for this mutation.

PMID:
1652893
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1683124
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk