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Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Mar;83(3):714-21.

Growth, bone mass, and vitamin D status of Chinese adolescent girls 3 y after withdrawal of milk supplementation.

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  • 1Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

A 2-y school milk intervention trial showed that 330 mL of a dietary milk supplement (fortified with calcium alone or with both calcium and vitamin D) enhanced the growth and bone mineral accretion of Chinese girls aged 10 y at baseline. Girls who received milk fortified with both calcium and vitamin D also had better vitamin D status than did girls who received nothing or girls who received milk fortified only with calcium.

OBJECTIVE:

The aim was to evaluate whether these effects were sustained 3 y after supplement withdrawal.

DESIGN:

Anthropometric measures and dietary intake were reassessed in 501 of the 698 girls whose data had been studied at the end of the intervention. As in the intervention phase, total-body bone mineral content and bone mineral density and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations were measured in half of these subjects.

RESULTS:

At follow-up, 99% of girls had reached menarche, at a mean (+/-SD) menarcheal age of 12.1 +/- 1.1 y. No significant differences in the timing of menarche were observed between the 3 groups (P = 0.6). No significant differences in the changes of total-body bone mineral content and bone mineral density since baseline were observed between the groups. The group receiving calcium-fortified milk had significantly greater gains in sitting height (0.9 +/- 0.3%; P = 0.02) than did the control group. The group that received calcium- and vitamin D-fortified milk had 17.1 +/- 6.7% lower serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations than did the control group (P = 0.04), but the difference was attenuated by additional adjustment for physical activity level (14.2 +/- 6.7%; P = 0.08).

CONCLUSION:

Milk supplementation during early puberty does not have long-lasting effects on bone mineral accretion.

PMID:
16522922
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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