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Neuroscience. 2006;139(3):1083-93. Epub 2006 Mar 3.

Dose-related antiallodynic effects of cyclic AMP response element-binding protein-antisense oligonucleotide in the spared nerve injury model of neuropathic pain.

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  • 1Department of Anatomy and K. K. Leung Brain Research Centre, The Fourth Military Medical University, Chang-le West Road No. 17, Shaanxi, Xi'an 710032, PR China.

Abstract

A transcription factor known as cyclic AMP response element-binding protein has been shown to be involved in the central sensitization in neuropathic pain and inflammation pain. The present study examined the roles of cyclic AMP response element-binding protein and of the phosphorylated cyclic AMP response element-binding protein in the maintenance of mechanical and cold allodynia induced by a neuropathic pain model, "spared nerve injury," in rats. First, the results of immunohistochemical study showed that phosphorylated cyclic AMP response element-binding protein, but not cyclic AMP response element-binding protein, increased bilaterally in the spinal dorsal horn 14 days following spared nerve injury, indicating a possible contribution of phosphorylated cyclic AMP response element-binding protein in spared nerve injury. Second, chronic intrathecal application of cyclic AMP response element-binding protein antisense oligodeoxynucleotide with three doses (10 microg/day, 20 microg/day and 40 microg/day) for 5 days demonstrated that the higher doses (20 and 40 microg) significantly attenuated both mechanical (bilaterally) and cold (ipsilaterally) allodynia, compared with sense oligodeoxynucleotide and the lower dose (10 microg). Western blot results showed that the alleviation in intensity of behavioral performance was accompanied by a significant reduction of total cyclic AMP response element-binding protein and phosphorylated cyclic AMP response element-binding protein in the spinal dorsal horn. Moreover, there were no differences in cyclic AMP response element-binding protein and phosphorylated cyclic AMP response element-binding protein between ipsilateral and contralateral dorsal horns. Our data demonstrate a close association between the expression of behavioral hypersensitivity and cyclic AMP response element-binding protein activation in the spinal dorsal horn following spared nerve injury, supporting the notion that phosphorylated cyclic AMP response element-binding protein may play an important role in the maintenance of chronic neuropathic pain.

PMID:
16515839
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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