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Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 2006 Jul;35(1):84-94. Epub 2006 Mar 2.

Species differences in the carbohydrate binding preferences of surfactant protein D.

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  • 1Dept. of Pathology and Immunology, Campus Box 8118, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. crouch@path.wustl.edu

Abstract

Interactions of surfactant protein D (SP-D) with micro-organisms and organic antigens involve binding to the trimeric neck plus carbohydrate recognition domain (neck+CRD). In these studies, we compared the ligand binding of homologous human, rat, and mouse trimeric neck+CRD fusion proteins, each with identical N-terminal tags remote from the ligand-binding surface. Although rat and mouse showed similar affinities for saccharide competitors, both differed markedly from the human protein. The human neck+CRD preferentially recognized N-acetyl-mannosamine, whereas the rat and mouse proteins showed greater affinity for myoinositol, maltose, and glucose. Although human neck+CRDs bound to maltosyl-agarose and fungal mannan, only rat and mouse neck+CRDs showed significant binding to maltosyl-Toyopearl beads, solid-phase maltosyl-albumin neo-glycoprotein, or the Phil82 strain of influenza A virus. Likewise, human SP-D dodecamers and trimeric subunits of full-length rat, but not full-length human SP-D trimers, bound to maltosyl-Toyopearl. Site-directed mutagenesis of the human neck+CRD demonstrated an important role of Asp324-Asp325 in the recognition of N-acetyl-mannosamine, and substitution of the corresponding murine sequence (Asn324-Asn325) conferred a capacity to interact with immobilized maltose. Thus, ligand recognition by human SP-D involves a complex interplay between saccharide presentation, the valency of trimeric subunits, and species-specific residues that flank the primary carbohydrate binding site.

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