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Br J Ophthalmol. 2006 Mar;90(3):372-7.

Proteomic analysis of human meibomian gland secretions.

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  • 1Schepens Eye Research Institute, 20 Staniford Street, Boston, MA 02114, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIM:

Human tears contain hundreds of proteins that may exert a significant influence on tear film stability, ocular surface integrity, and visual function. The authors hypothesise that many of these proteins originate from the meibomian gland. This study's aim was to begin to develop the proteomic methodology to permit the testing of their hypothesis.

METHODS:

Meibomian gland secretions were collected from the lower eyelids of adult volunteers and placed in a chloroform-methanol mixture. Samples were partitioned in a biphasic system and non-lipid phase materials were reduced, alkylated, and trypsin digested to obtain peptides for protein identification. This peptide mixture was separated by micro-capillary reverse phase chromatography and the effluent examined by nano-electrospray MS and data dependent MS/MS. SEQUEST software was used to identify proteins from the MS/MS spectra.

RESULTS:

The methodological approach to date has permitted the identification of more than 90 proteins in human meibomian gland secretions. Proteins include the alpha2-macroglobulin receptor, IgA alpha chain, farnesoid X activated receptor, interferon regulatory factor 3, lacritin precursor, lactotransferrin, lipocalin 1, lysozyme C precursor, potential phospholipid transporting ATPase IK, seven transmembrane helix receptor (also termed somatostatin receptor type 4), testes development related NYD-SP21 (also termed high affinity IgE receptor beta subunit), and TrkC tyrosine kinase.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings indicate that the meibomian gland secretes a number of proteins into the tear film. It is quite possible that these proteins contribute to the dynamics of the tear film in both health and disease.

PMID:
16488965
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1856970
Free PMC Article
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