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Am J Sports Med. 2006 Jul;34(7):1103-11. Epub 2006 Feb 13.

The effect of a balance training program on the risk of ankle sprains in high school athletes.

Author information

  • 1University of Wisconsin, Hospital and Clinics, Sports Medicine Center, Madison, Wisconsin, USA. ta.mcguine@hosp.wisc.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Ankle sprains are the most common musculoskeletal injuries that occur in athletes, and they have a profound impact on health care costs and resources.

HYPOTHESIS:

A balance training program can reduce the risk of ankle sprains in high school athletes.

STUDY DESIGN:

Randomized controlled clinical trial; Level of evidence, 1.

METHODS:

Seven hundred and sixty-five high school soccer and basketball players (523 girls and 242 boys) were randomly assigned to either an intervention group (27 teams, 373 subjects) that participated in a balance training program or to a control group (28 teams, 392 subjects) that performed only standard conditioning exercises. On-site athletic trainers recorded athlete exposures and sprains.

RESULTS:

The rate of ankle sprains was significantly lower for subjects in the intervention group (6.1%, 1.13 of 1000 exposures vs 9.9%, 1.87 of 1000 exposures; P = .04). Athletes with a history of an ankle sprain had a 2-fold increased risk of sustaining a sprain (risk ratio, 2.14), whereas athletes who performed the intervention program decreased their risk of a sprain by one half (risk ratio, 0.56). The ankle sprain rate for athletes without previous sprains was 4.3% in the intervention group and 7.7% in the control group, but this difference was not significant (P = .059).

CONCLUSION:

A balance training program will significantly reduce the risk of ankle sprains in high school soccer and basketball players.

Comment in

PMID:
16476915
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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