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Gastroenterology. 2006 Feb;130(2):312-22.

Heterozygous mutations in PMS2 cause hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma (Lynch syndrome).

Author information

  • 1Center for Human and Clinical Genetics, Leiden University Medical Center, The Netherlands. y.m.c.hendricks@lumc.nl

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

The role of the mismatch repair gene PMS2 in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma (HNPCC) is not fully clarified. To date, only 7 different heterozygous truncating PMS2 mutations have been reported in HNPCC-suspected families. Our aim was to further assess the role of PMS2 in HNPCC.

METHODS:

We performed Southern blot analysis in 112 patients from MLH1-, MSH2-, and MSH6-negative HNPCC-like families. A subgroup (n = 38) of these patients was analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). In a second study group consisting of 775 index patients with familial colorectal cancer, we performed immunohistochemistry using antibodies against MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2 proteins. In 8 of 775 tumors, only loss of PMS2 expression was found. In these cases, we performed Southern blot analysis and DGGE. Segregation analysis was performed in the families with a (possibly) deleterious mutation.

RESULTS:

Seven novel mutations were identified: 4 genomic rearrangements and 3 truncating point mutations. Three of these 7 families fulfill the Amsterdam II criteria. The pattern of inheritance is autosomal dominant with a milder phenotype compared with families with pathogenic MLH1 or MSH2 mutations. Microsatellite instability and immunohistochemical analysis performed in HNPCC-related tumors from proven carriers showed a microsatellite instability high phenotype and loss of PMS2 protein expression in all tumors.

CONCLUSIONS:

We show that heterozygous truncating mutations in PMS2 do play a role in a small subset of HNPCC-like families. PMS2 mutation analysis is indicated in patients diagnosed with a colorectal tumor with absent staining for the PMS2 protein.

PMID:
16472587
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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