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Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Feb;83(2):275-83.

Whole grains, bran, and germ in relation to homocysteine and markers of glycemic control, lipids, and inflammation 1.

Author information

  • 1Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Erratum in

  • Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Jun;83(6):1443.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Intake of whole grains is inversely associated with risk of diabetes and ischemic heart disease in observational studies. The lower risk associated with high whole-grain intakes may be mediated through improvements in glycemic control, lipid profiles, or reduced inflammation.

OBJECTIVE:

The aim was to examine whether the intake of whole grains, bran, and germ is related to homocysteine, plasma markers of glycemic control (fasting insulin, hemoglobin A1c, C-peptide, and leptin), lipids (total cholesterol, triacylglycerol, HDL cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol), and inflammation (C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, and interleukin 6).

DESIGN:

This was a cross-sectional study of the relations of whole grains, bran, and germ intakes with homocysteine and markers of glycemic control, lipids, and inflammation in 938 healthy men and women.

RESULTS:

Whole-grain intake was inversely associated with homocysteine and markers of glycemic control. Compared with participants in the bottom quintile of whole-grain intake, participants in the highest quintile had 17%, 14%, 14%, and 11% lower concentrations of homocysteine (P < 0.01), insulin (P = 0.12), C-peptide (P = 0.03), and leptin (P = 0.03), respectively. Inverse associations were also observed with total cholesterol (P = 0.02), HDL cholesterol (P = 0.05), and LDL cholesterol (P = 0.10). Whole-grain intake was not associated with the markers of inflammation. Whole-grain intake was most strongly inversely associated with markers of glycemic control in this population.

CONCLUSION:

The results suggest a lower risk of diabetes and heart disease in persons who consume diets high in whole grains.

PMID:
16469984
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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