Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Int J Infect Dis. 2006 May;10(3):255-61. Epub 2006 Feb 15.

Clinical and microbiological features of dientamoebiasis in patients suspected of suffering from a parasitic gastrointestinal illness: a comparison of Dientamoeba fragilis and Giardia lamblia infections.

Author information

  • 1Department of Microbiology, Saint-Pierre University Hospital, Brussels, Belgium. olivier_vandenberg@stpierre-bru.be

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To describe the clinical and microbiological features of Dientamoeba fragilis and Giardia lamblia infected patients, and to analyze the genetic variation of D. fragilis strains.

METHODS:

For a period of two years, all stool samples collected from patients suspected of having a parasitic gastrointestinal infection were examined according to our specific triple feces test (TFT) protocol. A retrospective case-control study was performed on D. fragilis and G. lamblia infected patients. Furthermore, PCR and genotyping by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) were performed upon the former.

RESULTS:

D. fragilis (6.3%) and G. lamblia (7.1%) were the most common pathogenic protozoa isolated out of 448 patients studied. Symptoms most frequently encountered with D. fragilis and G. lamblia infection were abdominal pain (69.2% and 72.4%, respectively) and diarrhea (61.5% and 79.3%, respectively). However, patients with D. fragilis infections suffered significantly less frequently from nausea and/or vomiting, anorexia and weight loss. After treatment, all D. fragilis and G. lamblia infected patients presenting a negative TFT follow-up also reported a complete resolution of their symptoms. Only genotype 1 could be detected in D. fragilis infected patients.

CONCLUSIONS:

D. fragilis and G. lamblia were the most frequently encountered parasites in our study population. Improved diagnostic tests are essential tools to study the prevalence and pathogenesis of D. fragilis.

PMID:
16469517
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk