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Mol Ther. 2006 May;13(5):1006-15. Epub 2006 Feb 7.

Sustained FVIII expression and phenotypic correction of hemophilia A in neonatal mice using an endothelial-targeted sleeping beauty transposon.

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  • 1Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA.

Abstract

Hemophilia A, deficiency of coagulation factor VIII (FVIII), is an attractive candidate for gene therapy as expression of modest amounts of FVIII can provide therapeutic benefit. Most gene transfer approaches for hemophilia have focused on the liver, as this is the major source of endogenous FVIII; however, increasing evidence suggests that endothelial cells are capable of synthesis and release of FVIII. Here the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon is employed to target long-term expression of the human B-domain-depleted FVIII gene (approved gene symbol F8) within lung endothelia of hemophilic mice. As the formation of inhibitory antibodies to FVIII has been a significant impediment toward achieving therapeutic plasma levels after gene or protein therapy, we chose to perform gene transfer in neonatal mice, which are more likely to be immune tolerant. Using this approach, low therapeutic levels of FVIII ( approximately 10%), as well as phenotypic correction of the bleeding disorder, were achieved in all animals that received the FVIII transposon and functional transposase throughout the duration of the study (24 weeks). Rechallenge of these animals with additional gene transfer did not result in significant increases in FVIII levels, due mainly to increases in inhibitory antibodies. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of using endothelial-targeted SB transposons for the treatment of hemophilia A.

PMID:
16464640
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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