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Schizophr Res. 2006 Apr;83(2-3):237-45. Epub 2006 Jan 27.

Neurocognitive and symptom correlates of daily problem-solving skills in schizophrenia.

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  • 1Program in Cognitive Neuroscience and Schizophrenia, Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, 140 Old Orangeburg Road, Orangeburg, NY 10962, USA. revheim@nki.rfmh.org

Abstract

Functional outcome for individuals with schizophrenia has been associated with cognitive impairment. Deficits in attention, memory, speed of information processing and problem-solving skills affect independent functioning, vocational performance, and interpersonal functioning. This study investigated the relationship between neurocognitive functioning, clinical symptoms and daily problem-solving skills in seriously and persistently ill persons. Thirty-eight inpatients and outpatients were administered a neurocognitive battery for attention, working memory, processing speed, perceptual organization, and executive functioning; and semi-structured clinical interviews using the BPRS and SANS. Estimates of daily problem-solving skills were obtained using the relevant factor subscale from the Independent Living Scales (ILS-PB). Daily problem-solving skills were significantly correlated with negative symptoms, processing speed, verbal memory, and working memory scores. A regression model using an enter method suggests that working memory and negative symptoms are significant predictors of daily problem-solving skills and account for 73.2% of the variance. Further analyses demonstrate that daily problem-solving skills and negative symptoms were significantly different for inpatients and outpatients and significantly correlated with community status. The findings suggest the ILS-PB has utility as a proxy measure for assessing real-world functioning in schizophrenia.

PMID:
16443347
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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