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Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2006 Jun;70(6):973-80. Epub 2006 Jan 26.

Robin sequence: a retrospective review of 115 patients.

Author information

  • 1Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Department of Otolaryngology, 243 Charles Street, Boston, MA 02114, USA. adele.evans@comcast.net

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Review a large series of patients with Robin sequence to document the incidence of (1) associated syndromic diagnoses; (2) co-morbid conditions; (3) frequency and type of operative management for airway compromise and feeding difficulties; and (4) possible differences in treatment between syndromic and nonsyndromic infants.

METHODS:

Retrospective case-review of 115 patients with Robin sequence managed between 1962 and 2002 at two tertiary-care teaching hospitals for evaluation of demographic information, clinical findings, and treatment interventions.

RESULTS:

Fifty-four percent (N=63) of patients were nonsyndromic. Syndromic patients included: Stickler syndrome (18%), velocardiofacial syndrome (7%), Treacher-Collins (5%), facial and hemifacial microsomia (3%), and other defined (3.5%) and undefined (9%) disorders. There was no statistical difference between the syndromic and nonsyndromic patients with regard to need for operative airway management (Fisher's exact test, p=0.264). Forty-two percent of patients required a feeding gastrostomy tube to correct feeding difficulties. Patients with a syndromic diagnosis were more likely to be developmentally delayed. Fifty-one (44%) patients underwent operative airway management: 61% underwent tongue-lip adhesion and 39% underwent tracheotomy. Fifteen percent of patients initially had tongue-lip adhesion subsequently required tracheotomy. While the preferred treatment for respiratory compromise differed between the two institutions, the percentage of patients requiring operative intervention was similar.

CONCLUSIONS:

The pathogenesis of Robin sequence is multifactorial and syndromic in nearly half of the patients. Operative treatment of respiratory failure was required in 44% of infants; the rate was similar in both hospitals. The operative approach differed significantly between the institutions, however, based on the philosophy and training of the managing surgical specialty. Co-morbid factors such as baseline cardiopulmonary and neurologic status did not play a significant role in surgical decision making.

PMID:
16443284
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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