Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
AIDS. 2006 Feb 14;20(3):419-27.

Major role of hepatitis B genotypes in liver fibrosis during coinfection with HIV.

Author information

  • 1Inserm U707, Paris, France.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Little is know about the determinants of liver fibrosis progression and genomic variability in hepatitis B virus (HBV) in HIV/HBV-coinfected patients.

METHODS:

A cross-sectional analysis examined common characteristics of HBV infection in an ongoing cohort study of 308 patients with both HIV-1-positive Western blot and plasma HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) seropositivity. Risk factors for liver fibrosis were studied in a subset of 104 patients for whom liver biopsy and complete HBV genomic analysis were available. Analysis was performed by exact multiple regression analysis.

RESULTS:

Mean age of the study population was 40.3 years, with a ratio male to female of 5.3 and a mean duration of HIV infection of 9.3 years. In the subset of 104 patients, plasma HBV e antigen (HBeAg) in HBV-replicative patients could not be detected in 28.4% and lamivudine-resistant mutants were detected in 67.8%. HBV genotype A was the most frequent genotype (73/104) and 25 patients were infected by the usually rare genotype G. METAVIR fibrosis score was rated F2-F4 in 70 patients. After adjustment for the most common known determinants of liver fibrosis, HBV genotype G [odds ratio (OR), 12.60; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.72-infinite; P < 0.009], efavirenz exposure (OR, 3.55; 95% CI, 1.14-12.14; P < 0.03), and the duration of HIV infection (3.86; 95% CI, 1.27-12.64; P < 0.01) were strongly associated with the risk of grade F2-F4 fibrosis.

CONCLUSION:

HBV genotype G is a determinant of liver fibrosis in HIV/HBV-coinfected patients and HBV genotyping should be considered as part of the management of patients with multiple risk factors for rapid progression of liver fibrosis.

Comment in

PMID:
16439876
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk